© DC Comics

DC Comics used to be called National Comics, the DC Comics name came from their well-known Detective Comics title. National Comics was then launched as an anthology title which ran 75 issues in the forties however this time with National Comics DC Comics is taking a different approach and publishing these as a series of one shots focusing on the lesser known characters within the new 52 universe.

NATIONAL COMICS: Looker #1 is from writer Ian Edginton and artist Mike S. Miller and focuses on the character of Emily Briggs who was a supermodel turned vampire. Emily Briggs is a character who has been a part of the DCU since the 80’s and was a part of the Outsiders team and initially was just a superhero who gets turned into a vampire. The one thing that I have enjoyed with the rebooted DC Universe is that you don’t need to know all much about most of their characters now, you can just pick up a book and not worry about thirty years of continuity (and don’t worry I love continuity) however I have mainly been a Marvel guy but this reboot allows me to be both.

I have to say I was slightly concerned when picking this up as I wasn’t sure how vampire comic set within the DCU would work but the cover really caught me. Mike Miller’s art work really jumped off the page and who doesn’t love red-headed vampire? As I turned the page it was as if the comic was reading my mind “I know what you’re thinking-vampires don’t exist…not outside..chick-lit-crap…Let me tell you what their not. They’re not  doe-eyed boy-toys.”  This opening paragraph of the main character describing vampires and her transformation while a rather hideous vampire sat above her and fed on her changing her from supermodel to vampire. It was a good opening and put me at rest going in – no sparkly vampires here. I do love the Twilight franchise but it’s a one-off, unless it’s Angel from Buffy we want butt-kicking-run-for-your-lives-vampires. The ones you don’t want to date and brood all over you.

So supermodel turned vampire quits the catwalk and now runs her own supermodel company. Throughout the issue we are introduced to her various employees and through flashbacks are introduced to how they met. The story itself flows nicely, with the introduction of her transformation and her new life. We then get the bad guy of the issue when we discover something has happened to people she knows (I won’t spoil anything here) and one of the scenes that really stood out for me was Emily jumping from roof top to roof top while trying to looking for clues. She was dressed in red and at it set clear nights sky, it made me think of Daredevil and I could quite easily see more adventures for the Looker and her friends.

Overall this was an easy read with a beginning, a middle and an end although left slightly open for Emily and her personal life. I think Ian did a wonderful job story wise as this was well written and entertaining. I couldn’t praise Mike Miller and the colouring team of Rex Lokus and Antonio Fabela enough for their spectacular art work. I would recommend this to anyone fancying a fun read and would be quite happy to pick up any further adventures with the Looker.

Published by Mark Brassington

Father and Husband. Works in Corporate Banking. Loves Books, Comics, Cycling, Music, Games, going to the Gym and Writing.

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2 Comments

  1. That cover is great and really sets the tone. I remember from her days in the Outsiders and this is a great way to get rid of all her continuity baggage. Looker sounds like a reluctant superhero.

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